WEIRD FACTS ABOUT
STRADIVARIUS

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STRADIVARIUS

One of the most valuable and famous musical instruments made by Antonio Stradivari is a cello known as the Duport Stradivarius, named after Jean-Pierre Duport, who played it in the early 19th century.

The instrument, which was later owned by the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, has a small dent in it, said to have been made by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1812 when he insisted that Duport let his try to play it.


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