WEIRD FACTS ABOUT
SNAIL

curly underline

SNAIL

Thanks to the sticky carpet they exude, snails can crawl along the edge of a razor blade without injuring themselves.

Sadly, however, they cannot crawl fast enough to escape from the French, who eat 40,000 tonnes of snails every year. Indeed, at its top speed of two inches a minute, a snail would finish a marathon in just over 18 months.

The French are not the only ones to pose a threat to snails. Oribasius, a fifth-century Byzantine physician, used to treat wounds with an ointment made from crushed snails mixed with flour. If he ran out of snails, he would use earthworms instead.

Snail-slime and sugar were once used to treat tuberculosis. Before World War I, Bristol glassblowers used to eat snails to improve their lung power. By contrast, one of the safest places for snails is the Swiss canton of Valais, where snail-hunting is illegal.

In 1996, a Nottingham professor discovered that sexual activity among tropical snails could be increased by feeding them porridge.

The World Snail Racing Championship takes place every year at the Cricket Field in Congham, Norfolk.

The world record for the 13in course was set by a snail called Archie who won in 1995 in a time of two minutes.

L'Escargot (which is French for 'the snail') won the Grand National in 1975.

A snail can have up to 25,600 teeth.

The giant African land snail can grow up to 15.4 inches from head to tail.


| Share |

Related links:

BOWERBIRD
The bowerbird of Australia and New Guinea has one of the most elaborate and extraordinary... MORE

COFFEE
Coffee is said to have been discovered by a ninth-century Ethiopian farmer, who realised his... MORE

HEDGEHOG
The hedgehog was a common symbol on ancient Egyptian amulets. Its hibernation and ability to... MORE

PURPLE
The colour purple is named after a snail, the mucus glands of a tropical sea... MORE

RICE
'Dakigokochi' is the Japanese name for a rice-filled bag shaped like a bundled baby and... MORE

You may also be interested in:

ASTRONOMY
The sun contributes 99.87 per cent of the weight of the entire solar system. If... MORE

DOWNING STREET
Downing Street in London is named after the soldier and diplomat Sir George Downing (1624-1684).... MORE

SNOW
More useless disinformation has been spread about the number of Eskimo (now Inuit) words for... MORE

IPSWICH
Lord Nelson was appointed High Steward of Ipswich in 1800.... MORE

ROOSEVELT
Franklin D Roosevelt became the first serving US president to fly in an aeroplane when... MORE

MUSEUM
In 1990, the Belgian artist Jan Bucquoy opened an Underwear Museum, the Musee du Slip,... MORE

TRAPPIST
Of the world's 171 Trappist monasteries, seven produce beer.... MORE

QUEUEING
A world record for the longest queue for a toilet was set in 2009 by... MORE

ARMENIA
The Armenian company Grand Candy were awarded a certificate by Guinness World Records in September... MORE

CHEWING GUM
In 1997, Hong Kong businessman Leung Ka-Ching successfully appealed against a fine imposed on him... MORE

DAYLIGHT SAVING
The UK Parliament passed a bill to introduce daylight saving and British Summer Time in... MORE

TRAFFIC
Delivering a judgment in 2006 on a case relating to a law designed to ease... MORE

MANILOW
Barry Manilow was born Barry Alan Pincus. On 14 August 1995, the... MORE

TANZANIA
Following a recent re-survey, Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania is now officially three metres shorter than... MORE

BALLOONING
The first person to cross the English Channel in a wicker basket carried by a... MORE

SPONSORED LINKS:

Ads by Google